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Adobo ~ I Use It On Everything!

Posted by itsupportgroup
itsupportgroup
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on Monday, 03 December 2012 in Recipes

spicesOne of the most important ingredients in Latin Caribbean cooking is a seasoning called Adobo. Adobo is an all purpose dry mixture that adds a little bit of Latin flavor to just about anything from poultry and beef to pork and fish. It is used to either season or marinate food. You can even sprinkle it on vegetables, stews, beans, rice and sauces.  I’ve even used Adobo to season tostones (see my previous blog: Tostones vs. Maduros).  My mom would often say that she could not cook without her adobo and I agree because I put that stuff on everything!

 

Adobo was first introduced as a way to preserve meats and such prior to the invention of refrigeration, but it’s now mostly used for seasoning and marinating meats.  The word Adobo comes from the Spanish word “adobar”, which means “to marinate”. Adobo can be prepared as a wet rub to marinate meats by adding an acidic ingredient such as vinegar, lemon, lime or orange juice. It can also be a dry rub called “seco”, meaning “dry” in Spanish.  Adobo seco is used to season food and is most popular in Latin Caribbean cuisine.  You are not likely to eat Latin cuisine without a dash or two of Adobo.

 

Today, you can buy commercially made Adobo seasoning in just about any supermarket spice shelf, but I much prefer to make it myself, as it is quick and easy to make with the ingredients I already have in my kitchen. 

 

ADOBO

6 tablespoons of salt

6 tablespoons of garlic powder

3 tablespoons of black pepper

3 tablespoons of onion powder

2 tablespoons of turmeric (optional)

2 teaspoons of ground oregano

 

Mix all the ingredients together and put in an airtight spice jar. It should last up to 6 months. Use it as a basic seasoning instead of just salt and pepper. Make it your own by adding or subtracting any of the spices to taste.

 

On Your Playlist- Songs to Marinate & Season with:

Buena Vista Social Club – Chan Chan

Santana – Samba Pa Ti

Hector Lavoe – La Murga

 

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itsupportgroup Thursday, 06 December 2012

There is nothing like Adobo!!! I even put a dash of it on my breakfast eggs. I go on panic-mode when I see my Adobo running out. LoL! BTW, BVSC "Chan Chan" is an awesome song! makes you want to dance while slicing your onions and of course splashing on your adobo.

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itsupportgroup Monday, 10 December 2012

Its great on eggs and home fries too. I like to add and subtract stuff to my adobo. The recent add on was Tumeric, it also gives it a good color too....Thanks for the comments!!!

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itsupportgroup Friday, 07 December 2012

Did you know you can also add adobo to your salads, with a little bit of olive oil, malt vinegar And balsamic vinegar, dash if salt and pepper. Great salad dressing.

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Jackie Monday, 10 December 2012

Jeannette: I really like that idea!!! I'm surprised I didn't think of it myself....Im going to try it this week...thanks for the tip!!!

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itsupportgroup Friday, 23 January 2015

Could you suggest a recipe using chicken and Dona Marie Adobo. I bought a jar of this seasoning thinking it was a Mole sauce and am afraid to open it now because I have no idea how to cook with it.

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Linda Tuesday, 15 March 2016

I received as a gift of adobo mix from a neighbor whose family had come up to visit from Mexico. They brought her a large bag of adobe mix, she generously gave me a full bag for myself. But this mix does not look or taste like any of the recipes I've read about, this actually appears to have cocoa powder in it and tastes a little sweet. Her English and my Spanish left me in a quandary not quite sure of "how" to use it. She said use it with your chicken like usual....hahaa, well our usuals are not usually alike I'm afraid. I'm lost at how to proceed, any advice would be helpful.

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Guest Sunday, 25 August 2019